Marva Vance & Thomas SJ Andersen

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101 Born when Petrea was 20 years old. She lived 1/2 day and was buriied in Vilslev. Gunda Marie Caroline ANDERSEN
 
102 Her Godparents were Niels Hollµnder's wife Anne Marie, Lundagergaard; spinster Grethe Thomsen, farmer Thomas Chr. Johansen, farmer S²en Andersen, farmer Peder Skytte all of Vilslev.
Other record said she died 7 Oct 1948 in Raahede, Hviding Parish and was buried in Vilslev. 
Gunda Marie Karen ANDERSEN
 
103 As a child she spent some time living with her Uncle Morton (father's brother) who was a Lutheran minister and had no children at the time. Her mother Patrea had her parents in the home and other young children and needed help for awhile. This was told to me by her niece Sine Brock Kulmvak Gunda Marie Karen M Andersen
 
104 Farmer in Jedsted Hans Ibsen ANDERSEN
 
105 Farmer in Jedsted. His sister married his wife's brother in a double wedding. Hans Ibsen Andersen
 
106 Jens Jorgen was born in Vilslev, Ribe, Denmark 16 June 1844. His Godparents were Jens Mortensen's wife Maren, Ane Marie Johnson, farmer Anders Jepsen, Nicolai Larsen all of Vilslev. He attended school in Vilslev which included just the grade (?)
Microfilm N. 7571 Vol 6 - Rt 2 Ribe, Denmark
During the war of 1864 he use to take the horses out to the ocean so the Germans would not get them. After the war he helped his father and they were able to help educate two older brothers. These two boys attended the University of Copenhagen. The older one, Morton, became a Lutheran Minister, Peter became a medical doctor.
After Jens father died, he took over the home place, along with quite a large debt against it. But with hard work he was able to pay off the mortgage, Besides farming he fed beef and ran a dairy. He finally accumulated enough so that he felt he could support a wife.
He was 35 years old at the time. He married Petrea Thomsen. She was 19 years old. He was 16 1/2 years older than she, but their marriage was a happy one.
He was the father of four children; Gunda, Karen Andres, and Thomas.
He was rather short but heavy built. He had a jolly disposition yet was firm. He was always interested in politics. He kept liquor in the house to serve guests but never indulged himself. He really did not care for coffee although he did drink it to be sociable. However, he said if it weren't for the cream and sugar, he wouldn't even do that.
He was conservative with money, yet none of the children lacked for necessities. He was very hospitable and guests always felt welcome and at home. He belonged to the State Lutheran Church although he favored the Free Lutheran Church. He was always regular in his attendance. He was confirmed at the age of 14. The year preceeding his confirmation two mornings out of every week was spent with the minister to prepare him for the big event of confirmation. This was customary for all children. The Church and the school worked together. He died at the age of 78, in his home in Vilslev.
Cemetery in Vilslev, Ribe, Denmark. Microfilm N 7571 Vol 6-Rt 2-Ribe, Denmark,
Family record of Thomas Andersen Family.
Copied from : DANSKE GAARDE, Vol. 3, by JH. C. B. la Cour (Kobenhavn: Dansk Landohonomisk Forlag, Ca. 1920) , pp. 1119/20. This book about farms in Denmark, is in the Mesa Genealogical Library and was donated by Thomas S. J. Andersen. "Ryttergaard: (rider farm) was originally part of "Kjaergaard" (marsh farm), an old manor in Hunderup Parish. It was sold by Krongodset in the late 1700's The following quotation from the Encyclopedia Am. , 1980 edition, describes events taking place in the late 1700's:
"After the Great Northern War (1699-1720), postwar economic difficulties occurred. To Deal with the shortage of farm labor, the "stavnsband" was established, binding peasant sons between the ages of 14 and 36 to the estates on which they were born. A few years later the age limits were changed to 4 and 40.
"In the second half of the 18th centry, the Danish government began to follow a policy of enlightened reform. Landowners were deprived of the judicial power over the peasants (1787) and an edict in 1788 proclaimed the end of the "stavnsband" within 12 years. A bank was created to help peasants buy land. The foundation was laid for the agrarian system of the 19th century."
Ryttergaard is in Vilslev Parish, Ribe County on the Jutland peninsula in Denmark. In 1864, the southern part of Jutland was lost in a war with Prussia and Austria, Now the Schleswig Holstein state of W. Germany. The following was found in an exercise in H. A. Koefoed's book, Teach Yourself Danish, 1958: "Hans Christian Andersen wrote a poem about Jutland in which he related the history of the moors. When he visited Jutland the moors were still there, but he foresaw that they would soon become cultivated and made into corn-fields. After the Danish Heath Company was founded, large parts of the moors were planted with trees, or the soil was ploughed and manured and thus improved. There are now many farms and small-holding where formerly there was only heather. One might say that through cultivation of the moors, Denmark gained internally what it lost when after the war of 1864 it had to cede South Jutland (S²nderjylland) to Germany."
The first individual owner of "Ryttergaard" (farm # 13) appears to have been the father-in-law of Anders Rytter, the next owner of the farm. After Anders Rytter died (about 1800) , his widow remarried.
In about 1805 , Soren Pedersen married the widow of Anders Rytter. In 1838, ownership of the farm passed to his son, Anders Sorensen Rytter. who died on May 15, 1866. The youngest son of Anders Sorensen Rytter, Jens Jorgen Andersen managed the farm for his mother until January 1, 1862 when he himself took over the farm.( Thus, Dad was named, in part after his grandfather Anders SORENsen Rytter.) 
Jens Jorgen ANDERSEN
 
107 Jens Jorgen was born in Vilslev, Ribe, Denmark.16 June 1844. He attended school in Vilslev which included just the grade (?)
Microfilm N. 7571 Vol 6 - Rt 2 Ribe, Denmark
During the war of 1864 he use to take the horses out to the ocean so the Germans would not get them. After the war he helped his father and they were able to help educate two older brothers. These two boys attended the University of Copenhagen. The older one, Morton, became a Lutheran Minister, Peter became a medical doctor.
After Jen's father (Anders T Rytter ) died, he took over the home place, along with quite a large debt against it. But with hard work he was able to pay off the mortgage. Besides farming he fed beef and ran a dairy. He finally accumulated enough so that he felt he could support a wife. He was 35 years old at the time. He married Petrea Thomsen who was 19 years old. He was 16 1/2 years older than she, but their marriage was a happy one. He was the father of four children; Gunda, Karen, Anders, and Thomas .
He was rather short but heavy built. He had a jolly disposition yet was firm. He was always interested in politics. He kept liquor in the house to serve guests but never indulged himself. He really did not care for coffee although he did drink it to be sociable. However, he said if it weren't for the cream and sugar, he wouldn't even do that.
He was conservative with money, yet none of the children lacked for necessities. He was very hospitable and guests always felt welcome and at home. He belonged to the State Lutheran Church although he favored the Free Lutheran Church. He was always regular in his attendance. He was confirmed at the age of 14. The year preceeding his confirmation two mornings out of every week was spent with the minister to prepare him for the big event of confirmation. This was customary for all children. The Church and the school worked together.
He was always interested in Politics,was elected foreman for the creamery organization and cooperative grocery. He was instrumental in getting a dyke built that kept the ocean from continually flooding in on the farms. He died at the age of 78, in his home in Vilslev.
Cemetery in Vilslev, Ribe, Dnmr. Microfilm N 7571 Vol 6-Rt 2-Ribe, Denmark.,
Family record of Thomas Andersen Family.
Copied from : DANSKE GAARDE, Vol. 3, by JH. C. B. la Cour (Kobenhavn : Dansk Landohonomisk Forlag, Ca. 1920) , pp. 1119/20. This book about farms in Denmark, is in the Mesa Genealogical Library and was donated by Thomas S. J. Andersen. "Ryttergaard: (rider farm) was originally part of "Kjaergaard" (marsh farm), an old manor in Hunderup Parish. It was sold by Krongodset in the late 1700's The following quotation from the Encyclopedia Am. , 1980 edition, describes events taking place in the late 1700's:
"After the Great Northern War (1699-1720), postwar economic difficulties occurred. To Deal with the shortage of farm labor, the "stavnsband " was established, binding peasant sons between the ages of 14 and 36 to the estates on which they were born. A few years later the age limits were changed to 4 and 40.
"In the second half of the 18th century, the Danish government began to follow a policy of enlightened reform. Landowners were deprived of the judicial power over the peasants (1787) and an edict in 1788 proclaimed the end of the "stavnsband" within 12 years. A bank was created to help peasants buy land. The foundation was laid for the agrarian system of the 19th century."
Ryttergaard is in Vilslev Parish, Ribe County on the Jutland peninsula in and Austria, Now the Schleswig Holstein state of W. Germany . The following was found in an exercise in H. A. Koefoed's book, Teach Yourself Danish, 1958: "Hans Christian Andersen wrote a poem about Jutland in which he related the history of the moors. When he visited Jutland the moors were still there, but he foresaw that they would soon become cultivated and made into corn-fields. After the Danish Heath Company was founded, large parts of the moors were planted with trees, or the soil was ploughed and manured and thus improved. There are now many farms and small-holding where formerly there was only heather. One might say that through cultivation of the moors, Denmark gained internally what it lost after the war of 1864 when it had to cede South Jutland (Sonderjylland) to Germany"
The first individual owner of "Ryttergaard" appears to have been the father-in-law of Anders Rytter, the next owner of the farm. After Anders Rytter died (about 1800), his widow remarried. In about 1805 , Soren Pedersen married the widow of Anders Rytter . In 1838, ownership of the farm passed to his son, Anders Sorensen Rytter. who died on May 15, 1866. The youngest son of Anders Sorensen Rytter was Jens Jorgen Andersen who managed the farm for his mother until January 1, 1862 when he himself took over the farm. (Thus, Dad TSJA, was named, in part after his grandfather Anders SORENsen Rytter.)
Jens Jorgen Andersen
 
108 was born in Vilslev and died at the age of 1yr 10 months on May 22 1843 Jens Jorgen Andersen
 
109 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Joe Vance ANDERSEN
 
110 Johanne died on August 10 1880, at the age of 37 when her youngest chil d was only 2 month old. According to the Vilslev Parish Register, she w as buried there on August 16, and was the wife of Jan Hjerrild, a farme r in Jedsted. The home farm was turned over to his rth child on May 1 , 1900 Johanne Andersen
 
111 Johanne died on August 10 1880, at the age of 37 when her youngest child was only 2 month old. According to the Vilslev Parish Register, she was buried there on August 16, and was the wife of Jan Hjerrild, a farmer in Jedsted. The home farm was turned over to his rth child on May 1, 1900 Johanne ANDERSEN
 
112 Alternate birthplace is Jedsted, Ribe, Denmark. John Marinus ANDERSEN
 
113 Fantastic farmer, great forman w John Marinus Andersen
 
114 Karan was born in Vilslev on October 10 1883. She married Johannes (John) Marinus Andersen in Vilslev on April 19, 1907. John was born in the neighboring community of Jedsted on April 10 1880 and was the son of farm owner Hans Ibsen Andersen and Sidsel Nielsen Helle. Karen was 23, and John was 27 years old when they were married. They raised their family in Chandler, Arizona. Their first child Ceclia, was born in Tempe on November 9, 1908. Their next child, Patricia, was born on June 22, 1910, on a train near Yuma when the family was on their way to Long Beach for the summer. Elizabeth was born in Chandler on April 7 1912, and John James was born in Chandler on October 15, 1915. Karen lived for 16 years after John, altho seperated before he died. He died on June 13, 1941 in a Phoenix hotel by an accidental slipping in the tub and drowning at the age of 61. Karen died in Mesa at the age of 73 on April 6 1957 The are both buried in the Double Butte Cemetery in Tempe, Arizona.
She has a picture taken of her at about 4 years of age it is thought that relatives might have had it taken when she stayed with them in Ringk²bing.
Her Godparents were: Mrs. Karen Johansen and spinter Margrethe Skade of Vilslev, farmer Niels Hollµnder of Lundagergaard, bachelor Johannes Thomsen and student m> Andersen opf Vilslev. 
Karen Kristina ANDERSEN
 
115 Karen was born in Vilslev on October 10, 1883. She married Johannes (John ) Marinus Andersen in Vilslev on April 19, 1907. John was born in the neighboring community of Jedsted on April 10, 1880 and was the son of Hans Ibsen Andersen and Sidsel Nielsen Helle. Karen was 23, and John was 27 years old when they were married. They raised their family in Chandler, Arizona. Their first child Cecelia, was born in Tempe on November 9, 1908 . Their next child, Patricia, was born on June 22, 1910, on a train near Yuma when the family was on their way to Long Beach for the summer. Elizabeth was born in Chandler on April 7 1912, and John James was born i n Chandler on October 15, 1915. Karen lived for 16 years after John, although they were separated before he died. He died on June 13, 1941 in a Phoenix hotel by an accidental slipping in the tub and drowning at the age of 61. Karen died in Mesa at the age of 73 on April 6, 1957 The are both buried in the Double Butte Cemetery in Tempe, Arizona.
She has a picture taken of her at about 4 years of age,, it is thought that relatives might have had it taken when she stayed with them in Ringkjobing. 
Karen Kristina Andersen
 
116 Minutes of the Funeral Services of Lilly Louise Andersen held in the Meldrum Mortuary Friday, April 16, 1940. Bishop Donald Ellsworth of Chandler Ward presiding and conducting. Brother and Sister Ben Riggs rendered the opening song, "Some Day Some Time Well Understand." Invocation was offered by William G. Wright first counselor to Bishop Ellsworth, after which Sister Lyons and Sister Evans sang; "Your Sweet Little Rosebud Has left You."
Bishop L. M. Mecham of the Mesa Fifth Ward was the first speaker. He spoke of the floral display that enshrouded the casket; How they in their purity and beauty, were symbols of the pure, innocence, and beauty of the little child that lay before us. He said he had been intimately associated with Tom and Marva, that Baby Lou came from the Lord and she has returned just as innocent and pure as when she came, that she would be seperated for just a span and then be reunited for Time and Eternity; through the sacrifice Jesus made for us we are assured of Eternal Life; Baby Lou's parents will receive her again in her youth and innocence and would be permitteed to bring her up in the world to come. He said that we as Latter Day Saints, should not mourn that this little child has been called back to God! Over this seperation we have no control. We live on before God as a proof of our faith in His wisdom; That we should live in worthiness of meeting this child in the hereafter.
Bishop Meacham expressed his feeling that The Spirit of God was present at this gathering in an abundance, and exhorted everyone to live as this little child had lived. He asked for the Spriit of God to comfort and bless this family in this hour of berevement.
Stake President Lorenzo Wright was the next speaker. He said that he lacked the command of words to express his thoughts and feelings on this occasion; He exhorted everyone to take advantage of every opportunity presented to them here in the few short years that we sojurn here. We are tested here to see how much we can endure in this sphere of existance. It is Satan's job to do this tempting and he is doing a fine job of it. And we must be on our guard.
He spoke of how beautiful this Angel loved one was; he emphasized what a privilege it is for parents to be permitted to be united in Holy Matrimony and have the privilege of bringing children into this world even if God does call them home in their beauty and innocence of youth; that the joy of meeting and reuniting with them in the life to come would more than compensate for the grief and disappointment experienced in this tragic seperation.
He said that tragedy is one of those things over which we have no control; that God is no respector of persons; he compared the tragedy in the death of this little child with that of the Savior's; that
God even chose a tragic death for His only Begottten Son here on earth.
He asked God to comfort and bless this bereaved family that they might have His Spirit to lead, guide, and direct them while they sojurned here upon the earth.
Mrs Joe Myers sang "Little Pink Rose", after which Second Counselor M.P. Thatcher offered the closing prayer.
Interment took place in the Double Butte Cemetery at Tekmpe. Former Bishop R. E. Brown dedicated the grave.

Baby Lou Died at 3 1//2 yrs. of age. She spilt gasoline from a can she was carrying to her big 5 1/2 year old brother Don. He was going to build a fire like he had seen his Daddy do. She was standing too close to the fire and her dress caught on fire. Vonda remembers the fire jumping to her dress.
Don had the presence of mind to throw dirt on her to put out the fire. Mom put KIP on the burn while she waited for Bishop Ellsworth to take them to the hospital. Baby Lou died 24 hours later. Because her sister and brother got the chicken pox, Mom thought her health was also down and the fire was just too much for her little body.

A poem that was given to Mom for Baby Lou

Dear God -
Our Baby's gone'
We're not complaining-
Trying just to understand-
Please hold our hands
Help us to see it straight-
Not hate nore envy those
Whose little ones are left.
We want to thank you, God,
For lending her to us
This little while-
It was a privilege!
Give us strength to smile
While our hearts break-Perhaps we failed
to do the things we should.
But , honest, God -
We did the best we could!
There never was a time We didn't come
When little sister cried-
Why, we'd a - died to save her, God!

She seems so tiny -
Out there - all alone;
They say therre is no night
Where she has gone -
But you know babies
Weary easy, God,

So when her little head
Begins to nod
Before the wonder
of your heav'nly place
Will you please let
Her gramma come and tuck
The cover round her face?
For gramma, somehow,
Always had a way with babies.

There's another thing
Her mother'would like to say
Perhaps, if you've a little time to spare,
You'll keep a bow of ribbon in her hair.

Blue ribbon, God -
The way we us to do-
O God - it can't be true
that she has gone -
It seems so wrong!
We miss her so -
Our aching hearts keep
Crying - "Why , oh why?"
But then -
We guess you know - For you, too,
Had to watch
your dear boy go -
We know it's spendid
on your shinning shore,
But sister's never
Slept away before -
So won't you take her
Little frightened hand
And tell her, plain,
In words she'll understand,
That Mom and Dad
Are coming to her - true -
You'll know how, God,
Tokeep a tiny girl
From being sad
For sure you had a
A little baby, too


Oh God, -
Please help !
It hurts -

Amen 
Lilly Louise ANDERSEN
 
117 1. Marens' husband was 52 when they married and she was 38 years old. Maren Guldager ANDERSEN
 
118 1. Marens' husband was 52 when they married and she was 38 years old. Maren Guldager Andersen
 
119 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Marilyn ANDERSEN
 
120 became a Lutheran Minister and was pastor in Balslev, and Ejby, Middelfart, Denmark. He also attended the University of Copenhagen. Morton ANDERSEN
 
121 He was named after his Mother's father. He became a Lutheran Minister and attended the University of Copenhagen. Pastor Morten Andersen, of "Kjobenhavn" attended the christening in 1885 of his nephew, Anders T.P. Andersen.
He never married but did help his sister Patrea by taking care of her daughter Gunda for a short time when she needed his help. 
Morton Andersen
 
122 REFLECTIONS, FLASHBACKS AND MOMORIES OF MOM AND DAD AS A CHILD AND THE GROWING UP PERIOD - PAINFUL AT TIMES: by Myrl Patricia Andersen Jacobsen
Most of the kids called Mother, Mom others call her momma - one brother calls her plain, "Ma" but all with affection. I dedicate these reflections to you , Mother, Mom or just plain, "Ma." Also with affection.
The first time that I saw our Mother, she was in a beautiful orange dress talking to another teacher in the arcade at the old Chandler grammar school. I was sitting on the cement playing jacks with a golf ball, I looked up and thought how pretty she looked. Indeed, she was. I also remember watching her! How full of life and spirit she seemed to be. She was that, too. Still is.
Another reflection or flashback is again, about a pretty dress. This is not a chilhood memory, but it is one of the still buoying periods, age 19 - Out mother sent to me a beautiful dress she had carefully made while I was in Nurses Training in Tucson. How eagerly I opened the package to find what she had made just for me. It was at Christmas time -also the one and only gift I hada. The dress will always remain in my mind even the hand done embroidery on it. It must have taken hours to give the dress the final, elegant touch. Also as it was at the end of the depression, it must have taken sometime to save a few dollars here and there just to buy the material. It is a gift that will never be forgotten.'
Another memory that comes to mind is the many times our Mom hauled me to Mesa for vocal lessons. As busy as she was with little tykes at home. She always got me there. Sometimes I would drive mbut most of the time was for naught. At least, however, it did give me an appreciation for in a small way, music thanks to her
One more flashback, can't resist this, is a not so fond ne. It was painful at the time. Very painful That's when our Mom hauled out every dish in the house and made me wash each one because I hadn't done a good job on the dinner dishes that day. A good lesson. I have tried to be tidy and careful ever since. I now bless dishwasher!! I am quite
s and or arguments as to whose turn it was to wash or dry. Like the cow, "Boys" who miled last?? Thank heavens I didn't learn how to do that. Somehow, Dad nor Mom could teach me to milk the cow. That didn't seem to turn me anymore than dishes. So "Happy Thanksgiving" to you, MOther and to all each and every one. Just keep the dishwashers going and add the paper plates when you run out of china. Mom you supervise! T.Hee
In Conclusion and one laast observation; Because of Mom's love, keen mind and supervision we can count our blessings. Let's join together in giving her many thanks and love for the many years she has worried, guided and tried to lead us all in the right direction.
REFLECTIONS OF DAD
Dad and the myriad of memories that Belong to Him. It goes back so far that it poses a problem of recall. Some are happy - some are sad."
I shall try to dwell on the happy things. not the sad ones. But where to begin Let's see: At random, and I will proceed from topic to topic.
1. One fond memory of Dad was when he used to hoist me on his broad shoulders when he went irrigating. What a sight that must have been a man with a shovel and a small child on his shoulders. Don't ask, anyone, what he did with me when he had to use the shovel, I have forgotten. All I know is he didn't want to leave me alone so he took me along in the fields.
2. The stories, the fairy tales, that he would tell. He made everything up as he went along Then he would promise to finish the story the next day. He always did. Probably, like T.V. how do I end the story I Started? It always came out fine. He had a certain talent in that department.
3 The next is a bit sad but an insight to Dad's character. He decided one day to take me to the Valley National Bank and get a small brown (Like a piggy bank) container in order to teach me how to save pennies. How well I remember the little brown bank. One day Dad said, "Myrl, I must use the pennies in your bank, we have no food or money to buy any." Tears were in his eyes because he had to take it away. It hurt him deeply.
4. Because Danes are a fun loving people and love parties, that brings to mind the Danish parties Dad would take me to. How he loved to dance the Danish dances, and I can remember how he and the men would swing the ladies aaout, all in a circle. I suppose what I watched would be called Danish folk dancing. Sometime he would play the violin at these parties. It was fun to watch Dad also eat the delicious goodies the woman would prepare. I don't think Dad brought any goodies, just me.
5. Dad would sometimes take me fishing in the mountains, just the two of us. A fisherman I am not. Dad would always have to bait my hook with a worm. Couldn't stand doing it myself. That didn't do much good, I never caught a fish except once a catfish. How he praised my big catch. Can't remember what we did with it. Anyway I was pleased because Dad seemed pleased that I finally caught something.
6. The following is not of childhood or young adulthood memories of Dad. A fairly resent memory. Once when Dad, Andy and I were chatting away on the front porch, Dad decided it was time for coffee. He asked me to make it and to serve it on a tray. I guess he was thinking about the way the Danes always serve refreshments. I, too, noticed the protocol while in Denmark. Needless to say, the coffee was made found a tray, and one would think they (Dad and Andy) were having caviar. Dad seemed to like the little extra flourishments now and then. That's the Dane in him.
As stated, many memories come to mind, but it would take eons to write. So please accept these few excerpts.

In repitition: We have two fine parents that have uuided us along the way. A start on the path of life. Bless them both


A MOTHERS WATCH OVER MYRL ANDERSEN

I wish I knew more about the circumstance, relative to your birth and early childhood, Mryl but I don't.
I know you were born Feb 11, 1922 in your home here on the ranch. From remarks I have heard you were a very beautiful baby. The pride and joy of your parents and Grandma Shirey and Aunt Ida. Also, Uncle John anad Jessie DeBolt.
Your father purchased a piano from George Fry. He owned the saloon in town so this piano was about the first in the town of Chandler.
Your mother was very gifted in Music. She could sing beautifully and could play the piano either by note or by ear. She used to play music during he silent films in the show house. Consequently your Dad was anxious to secure a piano for your Mother.
Your home the first years was a very happy one. then your mother came down with consumption. the best doctors possible were obtained. It was thought a change of climate would help so you lived in Prescott and Santa Barbara, California also Long Beach. For years everything possible was done for your mother. Your Dad mortgaged the farm to pay the medical bills. You were kept away from your mother because her illness was contageous. This was extremely hard on her for her waking and sleeping hours were of you. Her consistant cry was. Where is Myrl, I want to know if Myrl is al right. Where is she playing? Either Grandma Shirey your mothers' mother) or a housekeeper helped in the home.
When you were 7 years old your mother died. I know nothing about the funeral, but the Burial was in the Double Butte Cemetery in Tempe. The same family plot where your Aunt Ida, your father and sister Lilly Louise are buried.
Your mothers brother Everett lived with Grandma up in town on Buffalo St. I'm sure you often went from Cleveland School to Grandma Shireys which was a little more than a block away. She always had beans and homemade bread, fresh and canned fruits and vegetables for you to snack on after school.
She has told me what a comfort and joy you were to her.
I met your father when you were enrolled in the Chandler 5th grade. You were ill one time and he came to get your books and assignments.
Before this time you were constantly late for school. After this you arrived about 15 or 20 min. before school started. I had early yard duty so your Dad brought you to school in time for him to greet me each morning. I had no intention of going with your Dad but when he (with you) would drive over to Grandma Browns and ask me to go out to dinner with you I'd feel so sorry for both of you , I'd go.
Your Dad's thoughtful and kind attitude toward you impressed me very much and I finally decided he was just the man I wanted to marry. We were married the day after school let out May 27, 1933. You seemed very happy about the marriage but there were times since I'm sure, when you weren't so happy.
You had been the center of attention and the idol of all those Danes who use to congregate for Danish Parties. You were a beautiful child and had all the clothes and toys a spoiled little girl would have. The basement was full of toys you no longer cared about. The first Christmas we fixed over toys and with Uncle Everett as Santa Claus we gave the Willlis Children (Aunt Lilly and Uncle Emanuels) a real Christmas. You had more fun than anyone.
It was such a happy day for you and your Dad when Don was born. You had no more use for dolls. He was your constant joy. Then Vonda came 15 mo. later, you weren't very thrilled about that. Then another baby girl 12 and 1/2 mos later. I'm sure you felt terribly pushed aside. I was so busy I'm afraid I wasn't very understandng.
As soon as you graduated from High School you enrolled in St. Marys' Nursing School in Tucson. After 18 mo. you decided such a sad, morbid environment wasn't what you wanted so you came home. You next enrolled in a Business College in Phoenix. After completeing that you decided to go to San Francisco and live with Aunt Ida.
Where there you took an x-ray course and became a lab technician. The highlight of your life was when you met and married Andrew J. Jacobsen. He has been a wonderful husband, father son- iin- law and brother-in-law. 
Myrl Patricia ANDERSEN
 
123 He became a Medical Doctor and was in T²mmerby. However, that is a very small place and it might not be where he practised. He attended the university of Copenhagen. He had 3 children. Dr. Peder ANDERSEN
 
124 He became a Medical Doctor He attended the university of Copenhagen.
He was sent to school with the support from the family farm and his brother and Father took care of the farm. The 3rd brother was sent to school also and became a Lutheran minister.
From a relative in Dk -, Juhl Magne who wrote a report on him in 1994
-
As a medical student in Copenhagen he saved a 12 year old boy from drowning and for that he got a medal.
He was a medical doctor in Bramming from Nov 1880 until his death of the 1886
He married Marie Magrethe Fogh from the mill of Jedsted on the 30th of 1875 in Vilslev. She was 24 and they had 3 children: 
Peder Andersen
 
125 He farmed #11 in Vilslev. Other records have death in Copenhagen. Soren ANDERSEN
 
126 Soren was named after his Father's father. He married a widow who owned a farm in Vilslev. In 1881 he attended the christening of his niece Gunde Andersen, and also in 1885, he was from Vilslev when he attended his nephew's christening, Anders T.P. andersen. Sprem's wofe doed befpre jo, and je was a wodpwer and far, pwmer om Vo;s;ev wjem je doed at the Frederols Jps[ota; om Lpbemjavem pm Se[te,ber Soren Andersen
 
127 Susanne died when her daughter Sine was 2 years old. Susanne Andersen
 
128 1. Dad's first name - Thomas, as well as his third name - Johannes, is after his maternal Grandfather (Thomas Kristian Johansen) His second name, Soren, is after his fraternal Grandfather (Anders T. Rytters Sorensen.)

Thomas Soren Johaness Andersen was born in Vilslev, Denmark on the 30 of October 1887, about 3 o'clock in the morning. He was baptized into the Lutheran Church when he was two weeks old. A Mrs. Brock was his Godmother. He had two older sisters, Gunda, 6 years older than he, and Karen who was 4 years older. Anders was also his brother who was two years older than he.
When he was about two years old and while his sisters were taking care of him they accidentally stumbled with the carriage they wre pushing and the baby was thrown into the current bushes. His injuries weren't serious.
His first day at school was a very sad one for him. He cried all day. His teacher was a woman with a club foot and she rather frightened him. Before many days passed, he soon discovered that she was a very motherly sort of person, and he soon learned to love school.
All pupils in Vilslev, after completing four grades at school were given free tickets to the country fair. The children traveled on stock cars and trains. The benches were hard but what a wonderful trip to remember. Most of the excursions were educational and the expenses were paid by the government.
Tom graduated at the age of 14. There were many pupils who quit school at that ag, but Tom went to school for two extra winters. He was especially good at all sports. He stayed home one winter to help his father. The following summer he was hired out. After this he took a teacher course for two winters and graduated from this course. He then served eighteen months in the army in the Royal Horse guard. After this he received an offer to teach part time atheletics. At the same time he could continue his studies. He taught half a year and then decided to come to America.
The summer before coming to America, he and a friend toured Northern Europe and earned their way by putting on athletic stunts. They spent three months traveling and performing. Even at the age of 45, Daddy was able to do many of these same stunts. He came to Arizona in 1909. Daddy arrived in the United States at the age of 21 His father helped pay for his ticket providing Daddy would come to the U.S. for two or three years for a vacation and to visit his sister Karen. He traveled 2nd class, wasn't sea sick at all and he thoroughly enjoyed the trip. He arrived in Tempe in February wearing a long heavy coat, high boots and carrying an umbrella. His brother-in-law greeted him with these words, "Get the hell off the street - everyone is looking at you, you look like an immigrant."
Daddy worked for John Andersen ( a brother-in-law) for awhile then secured a job working for George Taylor in Tempe. Much of his work was with Mexicans so he learned the Spanish language before he did the English language.
After living in the U.S. for two years he decided he never wanted to return to Denmark to live but he wanted to make his home here. He paid a deposit on some land at $75.00 an acre. He worked part time for John Andersen and part time on his farm.
At the age of 31 he married Pearl DeBolt from Chandler, in the year 1918. In 1922 Myrl Patricia was born. When Myrl was 7 years old her mother died from tuberculosis after being ill for five years.
When Daddy was 45 years old he married Marva Vance who had taught school for four years previously in Chandler and was Myrl's 5th grade teacher. They were married May 27, 1933. On that same date, Tom and Myrl were both baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was baptized by James Darnall Vance and confirmed by Emanuel B. Willis brother and brother-in-law of his wife Marva.
There were nine children born to Tom and Marva. Don Thomas was born April 27, 1934, Vonda arrived July 21 1935, Lilly Louise was born August 3, 1936 and Joe Vance made his appearance on May 20 1938.
On April 23, 1940 we had the misfortune of losing Lilly Louise. She was accidentally burned to death. Just 10 months to the day after this accident, the twins were born on Feb 23, 194l. They were named Darnall James and Darlene. On March 12, 1942, Gerald Paul (Jeep) made his smiling way into the world. He was the war baby born about the time of the famous General Purpose or GP car whose name became "Jeep". The sound of Gerald Paul's initials were also GP and soon he was nick named Jeep. Marilyn was born January 9, 1944. Then Tommie Sue completed the family, making Thomas Soren Johannes Andersen the father of 10 Children
When Tom was 75 he had a serious truck accident. He recovered but did not attempt responsibility of running the farm again. His sons ran it for two years --then it was leased to Mom's nephew, Johnny Del Vance.

Some Articles writen about Dad that appeared in the Chandler Arizonan,
"Tom Andersen is planning a ranch home, 16x24 which will be made into a cozy place. " January 7, 1916.
"Tom Andersen has just sold 275 tons of alfalfa in the field for about $6.50 a ton. In addition he has leased 150 acres of pasture to Mr McDaniel's of Douglas for sixty days for $6.00 an acre. The douglas man will place about 350 head on the acrreage." Jan 7, 1916.

Feb 9, 1917: "Tom Andersen had blood in his eye these days because on Sunday some villianous villian departed with his Ford roadster, taking it from his ranch during his absence. Later --the machine was found in the road near the Geroge ranch." The Chandler Arizonan,

October 12 1917. -- House Warming ..Over 100 friends and neighbors gathered at the new home of Tom Andersen Saturday evening to aid its genial owner in formally dedicating the commodious ranch structure. Dancing was indulged until a late hour and a delightful supper was served during the evening. Everyone reported a most pleasant evening." Chandler Arizonan.

"John Dobson and family, John Andersen and family, Miss Pearl DeBolt (daddy's first wife) and Andres Sepsen are leaving in a few days for the coast where they will remain for a month." Chandler Arizonan, July 5 19198.

"Pearl DeBolt, Tom Andersen, are married....A wedding that well come as a surprise to the hundreds of friends of the young couple took place last Tuesday at Venice, Calif. when Pearl DeBolt became the bride of Tom Andersen, one of the successful farmers in the Chandler district..;" Chandler Arizonan, Friday, August 30, 1918.

A letter written in 1935 or 36, by Marva Vance, (Mom to Dad . Dad had left to go to Europe and visit his home place. His mother had just passed away.
Greetings My Dear,
How is everything with our 'loved one' in the far country of Denmark. I am anxiously and impatiently waiting to hear how you maade the memorable trip across the briney deep. Did you make your "debut a la bum" as preplanned? Don't leave out the details of your experiences when you write. They are fresh on your mind now and I am afraid you'll forget some of the interesting facts should you wait until you arrive home to tell me all.
You hadn't been gone from here four hours until Don had scaled the gate and unlocked it. I took him to Sunday School Sunday but needless to say, his conduct lacked the respect due a house of worship so I held Sunday Service inside watching him
Ellen is living with us and am I glad. It was like extracting teeth from the family tho. They didn't like the idea of her not being on hand to respond to their S.O.S. calls..
Grandma (Shirey) stayed with the children last night and we went to the Bishops and Owen Stewarts farewell. They had an unusually fine program and the house was packed to capacity with some standing in the rear . After the program we danced in the basement but it was much too crowded to be comfortable, I had a real good time tho. I think Myrl enjoyed herself also even Mr. and Mrs. Brooks from Tempe were there.
The farm work seems to be progressing nicely. Cecil is very conscientious in his attitude.
We had a smoky good time this morning. When I got up the stove was so stuffed up one couldn't see a flame even and it smoking like a smoke stack. It was cold as the dickens. I called up Mr. Armstrong and guess what! I did something I very very seldom do, No foolin' I lost my temper. I told him if he coudn't fix that stove he could take the damn thing out today. He and Cecil cleaned out soot by the sacks.
He said it was the blackest black job he'd ever gotten into. He was so sweet about everything and even fixed my vacuum before he left . I ordered some oil from Bill Lang and I think everything will be okay. Yes, My Dear, and even apologized for losing my temper.
I went to the Dr. today. Everything and everyone are fine. My Blood pressure is 100. Better than its ever been under similar circustances. The last two days I've felt fine. Only hope it lasts.
Well Mine darlin" it bed time and yours truely is rather sleepy, strange tho it may seem)
Myrl and Ellen just came in from Mutual and it's rather hard to concentrate there's too many interesting things to talk about. Not that I wouldn't rather put my mind on what you might be doing but it's rather an intangible imagination.
Honey, just have a splendiferreously good time, but don't forget you have a wife and kids in the good old U.S. A. who are waiting patiently for your return. Don still goes to the door and looks for you.
Lovingly
Marva and children

P.S. The radio is playing the song
"Red sails in the sunset, Far out on the sea
Oh bring back my loved one, Home safely to me."

Rather appropriate - no? Myrl said she'd try and write real soon
The weather has been lovely so far. Awfully cold toward morning tho.


It's "Father's Day." Tom Dear, just think Of all that word conveys
The head, the sire, and the guide and much more it portrays.
It stands for manhood brave and true and reponsibility
With love for wife and children five
That quite a family Let's try to make our home a haven
Of peace and harmony
You can't do it alone, nor I alone, It takes us both you see
Its "father Day" I salute you dear!I need you much indeed.
Side by side we must do our best
But you Tom take the lead.
Along with this little gift From Baby and your wife. We wish you happiness unlimited
Thru out your entire life.

A note from Baby Lou
I must say my little piece'Caus I have a present too
To give to the bestes Dad I know
With love from Baby Lou
OX 
Thomas Soren Johannes ANDERSEN
 
129 1. Dads first name of , Thomas, as well as his third name of , Johannas , is after his maternal Grandfather (Thomas Kristian Johansen) His seco nd name of ,Soren ,is after his fraternal Grandfather ( Anders T. Rytter s Sorensen.)

Thomas Soren Johaness Andersen was born in Vilslev, Denmark on the 30 o f October 1887, about 3 o'clock in the morning. He was baptized into the Lutheran Church when he was two weeks old. A Mrs. Brock was his Godmother. He had two older sisters, Gunda , 6 years older than he, and Karen who was 4 years older. Anders was also his brother who was two years older than he.
When Daddy was about two years old and while his sisters were takin g care of him they had the misfortune to accidentally stumble with the ca rriage they were pushing and the baby was thrown into the current bushes. His injuries weren't serious.
His first day at school was a very sad one for him. He cried all da y. His teacher was a woman with a club foot and she rather frightened hi m. Before many days passed, he soon discovered that she was a very moth erly sort of person, and he soon learned to love school.
THE CHILDREN OF PETREA AND JENS JORGEN ANDERSEN WERE KNOWN IN THE COMUNITY AS THE "RYTTER" CHILDREN AND WERE HIGHLY RESPECTED, BEING DESCENDENTS OF THE FAMILY WHO SUPPLIED HORSES TO THE KING IN EARLIER TIMES. (FROM FAMILY BOOK)
All pupils in Vilslev, after completing four grades at school were g iven free tickets to the country fair. The children traveled on stock ca rs and trains. The benches were hard but what a wonderful trip to rememb er. Most of the excursions were educational and the expenses were paid b y the government.
Daddy graduated at the age of 14. There were many pupils who quit s chool at that age. Daddy, however, went to school for two extra winters . He was especially good at all sports. He stayed home one winter to he lp his father. The following summer he was hired out. After this he to ok a teacher course for two winters. He graduated from this course. H e then served eighteen months in the army He was in the Royal Horse gua rd. After this he received an offer to teach part time atheletics. At t he same time he could continue his studies. He taught half a year and th en decided to come to America.
The summer before coming to America, he and a friend troured Norther n Europe. They earned their way by putting on athletic stunts. They spe nt three months traveling and performing. Even at the age of 45, Daddy w as able to do many of these same stunts. He came to Arizona 1909. Dadd y arrived in the United States at the age of 21 He father helped pay fo r his ticket providing Daddy would come to the U.S. for two or three year s for a vacation and to visit his sister Karen. He traveled 2nd class , wasn't sea sick at all and he thoroughly enjoyed the trip. He arrive d in Tempe in February wearing a long heavy coat, high boots and carryin g an umbrella. His brother-in-law greeted him with these words, "Get th e hell off the street - everyone is looking at you, you look like an immi grant."
Daddy worked for John Andersen ( a brother-in-law) for awhile then s ecured a job working for George Taylor in Tempe. Much of his work was w ith Mexicans so he learned the Spanish language before he did the Englis h language.
After living in the U.S. for two years he decided he never wanted t o return to Denmark to live but he wanted to make his home here. He pai d a deposit on some land at $75.00 an acre. He worked part time for Joh n Andersen and part time on his farm.
At the age of 31 he married a girl by the name of Pearl DeBolt fro m Chandler. This was in the year 1918. In 1922 Myrl Patria was born. W hen Myrl was 7 years old her mother died from tuberculosis after being il l for five years.
When Daddy was 45 years old he married Marva Vance who had taught sc hool for four years previously in Chandler and was Myrls 5th grade teache r. They were married May 27, 1933. On that same date, Tom and Myrl wr e both baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. H e was baptized by James Darnall Vance and confirmed by Emanuel B. Willi s brother and brother-in-law of his wife Marva.
There were nine children born to Tom and Marva. Don Thomas was bor n April 27, 1934, Vonda arrived July 21 1935, Lilly Louise was born Augus t 3, 1936 and Joe Vance made his appearance on May 20 1938.
On April 23, 1940 we had the misfortune of losing Lilly Louise. Sh e was accidentally burned to death. Just 10 months to the day after thi s accident, the twins were born on Feb 23, 194l. They were named Darnall James and Darlene. On March 12, 1942, Gerald Paul (Jeep) made his smiling way into the world. He was the war baby and came into existance about the time of the famous General Purpose car by the name of "Jeep". The sound of the initials G.P. sounded so similar to "Jeep" that he was soon nick named Jeep. Marilyn was born January 9, 1944. Then Tommie Sue completed the family making Thomas Soren Johannes Andersen the father of 10 Children
When Dad was 75 he had a serious accident. He recovered but did not attempt responsibility of running the farm again. His sons ran it for two years --then it was leased to Mom's nephew, Johnny Del Vance.

Some Articles writhen about Dad that appeared in the Chandler Arizonian,
"Tom Andersen is planning a ranch home, 16x24 which will be made into a c ozy place. " January 7, 1916.
"Tom Andersen has just sold 275 tons of alfalfa in the field for about $6.50 a ton. In addition he has sold 150 acres of pasture to Mr McDaniel's of Douglas for sixty days for $6.00 an acre. The douglas man will place about 350 head on the acreage." Jan 7, 1916.

Feb 9, 1917: "Tom Andersen had blood in his eye these days because on Sunday some villianous villian departed with his Ford roadster, taking i t from his ranch during his absence. Later --the machine was found in th e road near the Geroge ranch." The Chandler Arizonan,

October 12 1917. Fine House Warming ..Over 100 friends and neighbors gat hered at the new home of Tom Andersen Saturday evening to aid its genia l owner in formally dedicating the commodious ranch structure. Dancing was indulged until a late hour and a delightful supper was served during t he evening. Everyone reported a most pleasant evening." Chandler Arizonan.

"John Dobson and family, John Andersen and family, Miss Pearl DeBolt (dad dys first wife) and Andres Sepsen are leaving in a few days for the coas t where they will remain for a month." Chandler Arizonan, July 5 19198.

"Pearl DeBolt, Tom Andersen, are married....A wedding that well come a s a surprise to the hundreds of friends of the young couple took place la st Tuesday at Venice, Calif. when Pearl DeBolt became the bride of Tom A ndersen, one of the successful farmers in the Chandler district..;" Chan dler Arizonan, Friday, August 30, 1918.

A letter written by Marva Vance, (Mom to Dad . Dad had left to go t o Europe and visit his home place. His mother had just passed away.
Greetings My Dear,
How is everything with our l'loved one' in the far country of Denmark . I am anxiously and impatiently waiting to hear how you maade the memor able trip across the briney deep. Did you make your "debut a la bum" a s preplanned? Don't leave out the details of your experiences when yo u write. They are fresh on your mind now and I am afraid you'll forget s ome of the interesting facts should you wait until you arrive home to tel l me all.
You hadn't been gone from here four hours until Don had sealed it a nd unlocked it. I took him to Sunday School Sunday but needless to say , his conduct lacked the respect due a house of worship so I held Sunda y Service inside watching him
Ellen is living with us and am I glad. It was like extracting teet h from the family tho. They didn't like the idea of her not being on han d to respond to their S.O.S. calls..
Grandma (Shirey) stayed with the children last night and we went t o the Bishops and Owen Stewarts farewell. They had an unusually fine pro gram and the house was packed to capacity with some standing in the rea r . After the program we danced in the basement but it was much too crow ded to be comfortable, I had a real good time tho. I think Myrl enjoye d herself also even Mr. and Mrs. Brooks from Tempe were there.
The farm work seems to be progressing nicely. Cecil is very conscie ntious in his attitude.
We had a smoky good time this morning. When I got up the stove wa s so stuffed up one couldn't see a flame even and it smoking like a smok e stack. It was cold as the dickens. I called up Mr. Armstrong and gues s what! I did something I very very seldom do, No foolin' I lost my temper. I told him if he coudn't fix that stove he could take the damn thing out today. He and Cecil cleaned out soot by the sacks.
He said it was the blackest black job he'd ever gotten into. He was so sweet about everything and even fixed my vacuum before he lef t . I ordered some oil from Bill Lang and I think everything will be ok ay. Yes, My Dear, and even apologized for losing my temper.
I went to the Dr. today. Everything and everyone are fine. My Blood pressure is 100. Better than its ever been under similar circustances . The last two days I've felt fine. Only hope it lasts.
Well Mine darlin" it bed time and yours truely is rather sleepy . 9 strange tho it may seem)
Myrl and Ellen just came in from Mutual and it's rather hard to concentrate there's too many interesting things to talk about. Not that I wouldn't rather put my mind on what you might be doing but it's rather an intangible imagination.
Honey, just have a splendiferreously good time, but don't forget you have a wife and kids in the good old U.S. A. who are waiting patiently for your return. Don still goes to the door and looks for you.
Lovingly
Marva and children

P.S. The radio is playing the song
"Red sails in the sunset, Far out on the sea
Oh bring back my loved one, Home safely to me."

Rather appropriate - no? Myrl said she'd try and write real so on
The weather has been lovely so far. Awfully cold toward morning tho .


It's "Father's Day." Tom Dear, just think Of all that word convey s
The head, the sire, and the guide and much more it portrays.
It stands for manhood brave and true and reponsibility
With love for wife and children five
That quite a family Let's try to make our home a haven
Of peace and harmony
You can't do it alone, nor I alone, It takes us both you see
Its "father Day" I salute you dear!I need you much indeed.
Side by side we must do our best
But you Tom take the lead.
Along with this little gift From Baby and your wife. We wish you ha ppiness unlimited
Thru out your entire life.

A note from Baby Lou
I must say my little piece'Caus I have a present too
To give to the bestes Dad I know
With love from Baby Lou
OX 
Thomas * Soren Johannas Andersen
 
130 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Tommie Sue ANDERSEN
 
131 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Vonda ANDERSEN
 
132 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Vonda ANDERSEN
 
133 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Zoe Maria ANDREASON
 
134 She leaves Lewis Vance and follows John D. Lee out to Winter quarters and asks to become part of his family. She is sealed to him on February 27 1847. She dies at Summer Quarters in August, 1847. Nancy Gibbons Armstrong
 
135 The F. was either mistaken for an S. for the S. as the maddile initial is how he was also listed. Charles Francis S. Ausenbaugh
 
136 It is listed in the 1870 Census as H. G. M. Aussenbaugh.
1880 listed as Hanna M. 
Hannah Maggie Gustava * Ausenbaugh
 
137 1910 Census states that he is divorced. James W. Ausenbaugh
 
138 1920 John W. is still living with his mother who is a widow now. John W. Ausenbaugh
 
139 In the 1870 Census it states that Mary, same children, born in Pennsylvania instead of Ohio.
1850 Census gives her name as Mary A. age 32

In 1870 Census also states that a 2 year old Girl named Martha born 1868 but it states that she is a daughter . However, mary Ann is too old at this time to have a child.

1880 Census shows Marn Ann as a widow.and son James J. is 35 ears of age. and single. and Both parents born in North Carolina. 
Mary Ann Ausenbaugh
 
140 Collections of Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1685-1795 pg 326

pg/# 17 Date: Apr 29, 1773 Proved: Nov. 22, 1778
John Baalderstond Senr. of Solebury, Weaver
wife Hannah and Son John, Exrs - Sons John, Jonathan, Bartholomew, Timothy, Jacob Isaiah and Mordicai - Daughter, Hannah, Sarah, Lydia and Mary - Legacy bequeathed to ch. by Bartholomew Balderston of Great Britain dec. - Wits Saml Armitage, James Armitage and John Armitaged Caveah filed by Son Bartholomew - Nov 16 1778 on ground of failure of testator to takae oath of allegiance. John debarred from exship for same reason. 
John Balderston
 
141 born U.S. Lucy Bales
 
142 Brothers and sisters marry. Elizabeth Barlow
 
143 Brothers and sisters Marry Rachael Barlow
 
144 Will of Anne Barnes father - wife of Burr Harrison,states:
June 1745 - 10 Feb 1745/ 6. Charle Co, MD Will Book 24 . Will of Mathew BARNES. Names wife Mary and Ch: Godshall, Mathew, Philip, Henry, Jane HEREFORD (dau), Elizabeth COURTS(dau.) , Ann HARRISON (dau), Frances HARRISON (dau) Ex: Mary BARNES wife Henry BARNES (son) Pro: 2-10-1745; 308, 24 (Combs Researcher Loren Gardner) 
Anne Barnes
 
145 1900 Census states that they have had w10 children of which 7 are still living Mary Elizabeth Barnes
 
146 He was the informant on death certificate. Otho Barnes
 
147 In the 1910 Census she is listed as after Flora who is only 1 at the time and she is listed as Barns Alberty whether Betsy , her mother, had been married before is not known at this time. She is listed as a daughter under the household of Henry C. Cook. Alberty Barns
 
148 Oct 9, 1829 permission by Thos Darnall for his daughter to marry
Original marriage Bonds of Caldwell Co. Ky.
Vital statistics birth record(1852) has her listed as Arena.
She stays in Caldwell, Kentucky as her father moves to Kansas

1. 1880 CensusMt Vernon, Larwence Missouri Irene Amona is not listed but Son Fryan is listed as 8 years of age, (I am wondering if she died in Child birth) Husband is listed as widower. Death would have occured between : 1872 and 1880 
Arena Amona Bashaw
 
149 1900 he is living in DeKalab, Kansas James Benjamin Bashaw
 
150 Irene Amon1850 Census state he has Real Estate as 400 It also shows him as a widower. Son James and daughter Caroline living with him. His son in law James Clayton and Daughter Irene Amona as well are there with him. His wife Mary Polly is not listed.
1. Check to See if Peter Bashaw of Virginia has a son THomas H. Bashaw.
2. In the 1860 census he has moved to, Homboldt, Allen, Kansas His daughter age 20 and son James is living with him.It states that Daughter Caroline is born in Missouri and son James is born in Virginia, they eventually move to Caldwell Kentucky and by 1860 They are living in Allen, Homboldt Kansas. with 800 acres son James has 600 acres.
3. 
Thomas H. Bashaw(Basham)
 

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